Call for Papers: (4-2018) Language and Citizenship Education: Discussion, Deliberation and Democracy

                           

The Journal of Social Science Education will publish a special issue in November 2018 on the theme of ‘Language and Citizenship Education: Discussion, Deliberation and Democracy’. The issue will be edited by Beatrice Szczepek Reed, Kings College London, UK and Ian Davies, University of York, UK.

 

We wish to explore ideas and issues about citizenship education and its connection with language.

There are several obvious connections between language and citizenship education. Language has instrumental value to a citizen. The rights and duties of citizens are stated and absorbed through language. Language is an aspect of culture and has cultural impact. Citizens become socialised into societal norms and learn to adopt preferences in part through language-based interaction. Language is also a form of social contract in which there are opportunities for democratic (or, other types) of dialogue. Significant politically relevant practices such as advocacy and representation may occur principally through language. Across these various elements – instrumental, cultural and political – language achieves a place that is vitally important to citizenship. Language is a fundamentally important platform and process for the development and expression of identities in contexts that are differentially inclusive. It is likely that a sense of citizenship belonging is heavily dependent on language.

The nature and impact of globalization may, confusingly, be leading both to pressures for less linguistic diversity with the dominance of a very few world languages (such as English) and at the same time, by contrast, to greater levels of migration with consequent increased awareness of linguistic pluralism. The experiences of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers as they pursue the legal status of citizenship - and experience informal aspects of citizenship - are likely to have important linguistic elements. The nature of citizenship tests that ordinarily include language elements and the ways in which people are prepared for them (and how applicants perceive them) are relevant to this edition of the JSSE. The ways in which citizenship issues are discussed in educational contexts are clearly of great significance. We intend to include work that illuminates the nature of learning and teaching about - and for - democracy. We are very interested in what language means for citizens’ identities and what impact it has on the development of an inclusive society in which all feel that they belong.   

We are reluctant to impose a very rigid framework but we would be interested in knowing how authors respond to one or more of the following (overlapping) questions:

  • What are the philosophical foundations and contemporary theoretical debates about language and how do they relate to citizenship education and social studies/social science education?
  • How is language used by governments, governmental agencies, think tanks and other public bodies to inform, educate and control young citizens via citizen education and language policy?

  • What does language mean to young people (including their families and communities) and to professionals? Do they see it as a means by which they can understand, promote and practise citizenship?
  • What is done when a connection is made between language and citizenship education? What sort of teaching, learning and assessment activities occur?
  • What impact does language-related citizenship education have?
  • What are the likely and desired futures for language based citizenship education?

We will be pleased to consider work that emerges from a single context (e.g., from one local, regional or national location) as well as from analyses that go across geographical and other areas including comparative perspectives. We will consider reports from European and other countries where language issues and issues of national or ethnic identities and cleavages are closely connected and contested.

The issue will contain:

  • An editorial in which key themes are highlighted and articles are briefly summarized;
  • 6 articles of between 6-9000 words;
  • 4-6 book reviews (each approximately 4-800 words long) on issues to do with character, citizenship and education.

The focus of the special issue will be education but the editors will welcome theoretical and other material that allows for consideration of issues using insights from a range of academic disciplines and areas (e.g. political science; psychological perspectives; international studies etc.).

The focus of the special issue will be education but the editors will welcome theoretical and other material that allows for consideration of issues using insights from a range of academic disciplines and areas (e.g. political science; psychological perspectives; international studies etc.).

Those wishing to discuss matters about the special issue should contact: Ian Davies (ian.davies@york.ac.uk) or Beatrice Szczepek Reed (beatrice.szczepek.reed@kcl.ac.uk)

The following schedule will be used:

Final submission from authors: 1 July 2018

Final reviewing and papers ready for layout: 30 September 2018

Publication: November 2018

Guidance about the presentation of articles is available on the JSSE site at http://jsse.org/index.php/jsse/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Please use the online submission system to submit a paper.

The JSSE adopts the COPE Guidelines on publication ethics.